It all comes down to fiddling with the settings. Trial and error.

If the aberration is causing the image to spread outside of the canvas, here’s a way to fix it…

Add a new layer underneath the original. Now navigate to Image > Canvas Size and set it like the image above (the amount you make it will vary depending on how big your canvas is. I usually go bigger than intended and crop down afterwards.), click OK and then set the base layer to white and then with the original selected center it within the canvas (make sure you have Snap toggled on under the View menu).

Now if you enable aberration you should be able to see it around the edges. :)

1 year ago 33 notes
The monochrome process video you just posted is really cool, I love watching that stuff! Thanks for sharing. Would you mind sharing what brushes/settings you use?

There’s something just so satisfying and mesmerizing about watching digital speedart.

A few things…

  • Window > Arrange is really helpful when setting up your reference and canvas next to each other.
  • Toggle or CTRL+’ to turn grids on and off. Also adjust sizing/colour of grid in Guides, Grids & Slices under preferences.
  • I recommend buying Coolorus ($10) for a super easy colour picker just like the one in Painter. Never have to open the colour picker eveeer again.
  • Chromatic aberration, man. Loish uses it in her work a lot. It gives you that awesome 3D colouring on the edges (see here) Find it under Filter > Lens Correction…
  • BRUSHES! You get a brush! And YOU get a brush! Everyone gets brushes! *cheering*

The documented process of the master study I painted. Phew! Hopefully you can all read my writing okay…

See the full thing here!

1 year ago 39 notes

Painting progress, part 2 // part 1

  • Use the Mixer brush to soften areas like the background and the contrasting edge of the collar against the dark material. A lot of people don’t realise that the mixer brush is there to be used in conjunction with digital painting (I for one am guilty of this; not discovering it’s uses until quite recently) - I mean it is called the mixer brush for a reason… Why spend time blending and re-blending with a brush set to low opacity when you can do it with the tool made for the job? Stray from the overly-smudged look though, unless of course that’s what you’re going for…

  • On a new layer (if you aren’t already you should be doing this automatically whenever you begin a new section - remember you can always merge down when you’re happy!) you can use the grainy brush to add texture to the face. Nabbing the colours with the eyedropper and slightly altering the brightness or tone (because painting on top of the face with the same colours that you used to paint said face is pretty pointless, right? Makes it difficult to see the difference in brushstrokes, etc..) and slap your areas down as heavily as you’d like. I then take the eraser - set to the texture brush also - and carefully erase the rougher edges and bits that need tuning down. You want to be able to see the texture but have it blend evenly into the skin too.

    Another way of doing this is using the texture brush with the Dodge and Burn tool, but there’s a lot more freedom when you manually pick your own palette, I think.

  • You can then grab the pore brush and using this technique lightly go over the face and neck. Set to Outer Bevel, erase any problem areas (dark shadows like under the nose, eyelashes and on the lips)

  • Lastly: sharpen it, yo.
    Filter > Smart Sharpen or Unsharp Mask will make your work look 20 times more amazing. Trust me.

———————————————————————————————

Is there anything dire that I have missed? Let me know! Or just say hi. But I’m always happy to help with PS things ;D

I’ll upload the full painting sooooon / Reference image.

1 year ago 75 notes

A quick little trick for rendering skin…

Okay so I’ve posted about this brush that I use all the time when painting skin (take a look in my tutorial section), like seriously, I only use this one because it works so unbelievably well and looks super realistic with minimal effort.

Set it to 100% opacity and flow as it’s easier to handle and paint a light layer (I say light because it goes down pretty heavily so use it sparingly) with a neutral colour - not too light or dark in comparison with your base colour. You can either leave it as is but it still looks pretty flat as there aren’t any shadows/highlights to give the pores real depth.

The simple solution: double-click your pore layer and give it an Outer Bevel with a size and depth of 0. Insta-skin!

1 year ago 93 notes

A few extra tips…

Apart from the line sketch at the beginning, I use a softer brush when creating the initial shape and layout (see Part 1) as it is much easier to work with in terms of mixing and evenly blending tone or hue.

Fine-tuning and incorporating particular details (which is my favourite part of all) is done with a rough hard texture brush. I usually play with the flow and opacity settings to tone it down and such. It’s good for ‘dotting’ as well as you can produce some interesting textures.

You can download some heavy texture brushes that I made the other day here. ;D (includes texture brush used here)

Charlie Bowater’s brushset is pretty darn amazing so you should go download it also (which includes the soft one I used to paint this).

1 year ago 44 notes

Painting progress, part 1

I’ve been meaning to film myself/take a few more screenshots of my process so here we go. I’ll put the second half up in the next day or so.

  • There’s always that certain stage of drawing or painting when you’re considering throwing in the towel because it’s taking just that extra push to go from uneven dabs of colour to a specific shape or form (see the third and fourth image). Persistence is key!
  • After completing the sketch, focus on particular areas one at a time (for instance the collar). Paint your base colour, add a new layer and alt+click between the new layer and the original below and you don’t have to worry about painting outside of your shape. I generally paint shadows first and highlights second. Working your way up is probably easiest.
  • I wouldn’t recommend starting on a blank white canvas or you’ll have to lay the colour down with 100% opacity for it to completely cover the white. Start with a neutral colour or gradient as it saves time of underpainting and makes it way easier to get a nice blend of colours. I only use pure white when putting in really fine details like light in the eye or the shine on the nose.

Reference image.

1 year ago 228 notes

Guys: you need to download this brush pack.

This contains my go-to skin and pore brushes (as well as fur and other pretty bits and pieces).

A few people have been asking about how I paint skin - and apart from that original skin tutorial I made - these pore brushes are what I use. Definitely recommended.

1 year ago 31 notes

imorawetz:

Basic skin texture tutorial

  1. Create a new layer over the original and eyedrop both a light and dark tone from the base work.  These two colours are what we’ll use as the shadows and highlights of the speckles in the skin.  To paint the texture, we need to use a grainy or dotted brush.
  2. Set the brush Opacity and Flow to 60-80%.  Now we can paint in our dark speckles, paying close attention to creases and folds in skin (build the texture up in these darker areas).  Now do the same with the light colour, with the focus on painting the highlighted parts of the skin rather than dark.
  3. We’ll grab the eraser now, set as a soft round brush with low opacity, and gently erase the ‘harshness’ of the texture away.  We could just turn down the whole layer’s opacity but it won’t look as natural (trust me!). 
    Some areas will need to be generally darker, some lighter, it’ll obviously vary depending on subject.  Also, taking a step back every now and then to observe clarity in the texture can help you determine whether it needs fixing or looks realistic enough.
  4. Now we’ll create another new layer, and again taking the brush (larger in size this time, same opacity/flow) loosely spatter it across the skin in both dark and light.  This adds another dimension of detail. Once again, take the eraser and lightly brush over the layer to tune it down.
  5. To enhance the sharpness and overall level of detail that can be seen, we can bump up the definition by adding this quick textural overlay. I usually leave this part until the very end of the process as it pulls the painting together and is oh so satisfying seeing the level of detail jump up when the gritty texture is added.
1 year ago 5,304 notes

3 FREE PHOTOSHOP BRUSHES FOR DOWNLOAD

The following brushes have been slapped together by myself, but I didn’t create them from scratch so I’m not taking full credit. They’ve been created using previously downloaded brush packs (from DeviantArt and other various websites) and I actually use these quite regularly. So yeah. Enjoy!


Instructions:

  1. Click download, yo
  2. Right click on the .abr file and open with Photoshop
  3. Three brand spankin’ new brushes are now sitting in your brush palette!
  4. AWESOME RIGHT

Go forth and create pretty things and be sure to show me because I WANT TO SEE

1 year ago 182 notes

Painting in Negatives

A couple of helpful mini tips:

You don’t have to use the eraser to get rid of unwanted areas. For instance, using line art of a circle [A] you can create a layer underneath it and scribble the paint in, not having to worry about going outside the lines. You then use the brush and, with the same colour as the background, paint around the circle [B]. Make sure you have it set to a low opacity so you can ease the extra colour out rather than just blocking. You can be as loose or intricate as you like [C].

Another example with a more dynamic shape [D] and how simple it is to give it the painted effect without boring old colour blocking [E]. You can always turn off or delete the line art layer to see how it’s looking [F].

If you want to paint on a particular area without going outside your newly created edges, do this: on a new layer above the original colour, paint in whatever you want [G] and then ALT+click the line between the two layers [H]. You can either do this as soon as you create the new layer or wait until you’ve painted something in (I usually do it at the start just so it’s easier to see what it will look like) [I].

1 year ago 45 notes
I've noticed in your other tutorials you tend to draw stuff (with shading and gradients included) in black and white, and then colour it later. You kiiind of go in to detail in one of your tutorials where you talk about soft light v. overlay, but I don't understand where you go from there. Whenever I try to draw something in black and white and then colour it in it always fails miserably and looks really muddy and dull. I don't understaaand?

It’s a matter of getting just some colour down onto the canvas that will allow you to work from. I understand what you mean about colours looking muddy or off. Painting in with a different tone or even hue in the shadows and highlights rather than blocking in with a single colour can help give it more depth. I then adjust this layer via curves or selective colour. Leaving your work at this stage is up to you, but if the colour still looks flat, I start a new layer (normal blending mode) and eyedrop portions of the colour and bump up the vibrancy in the colour picker (the Coolorus extension works wonders here and saves you time) to paint atop the initial colour.

imorawetz:

Basic skin texture tutorial

  1. Create a new layer over the original and eyedrop both a light and dark tone from the base work.  These two colours are what we’ll use as the shadows and highlights of the speckles in the skin.  To paint the texture, we need to use a grainy or dotted brush.
  2. Set the brush Opacity and Flow to 60-80%.  Now we can paint in our dark speckles, paying close attention to creases and folds in skin (build the texture up in these darker areas).  Now do the same with the light colour, with the focus on painting the highlighted parts of the skin rather than dark.
  3. We’ll grab the eraser now, set as a soft round brush with low opacity, and gently erase the ‘harshness’ of the texture away.  We could just turn down the whole layer’s opacity but it won’t look as natural (trust me!). 
    Some areas will need to be generally darker, some lighter, it’ll obviously vary depending on subject.  Also, taking a step back every now and then to observe clarity in the texture can help you determine whether it needs fixing or looks realistic enough.
  4. Now we’ll create another new layer, and again taking the brush (larger in size this time, same opacity/flow) loosely spatter it across the skin in both dark and light.  This adds another dimension of detail. Once again, take the eraser and lightly brush over the layer to tune it down.
  5. To enhance the sharpness and overall level of detail that can be seen, we can bump up the definition by adding this quick textural overlay. I usually leave this part until the very end of the process as it pulls the painting together and is oh so satisfying seeing the level of detail jump up when the gritty texture is added.
1 year ago 5,304 notes
1 year ago 262 notes

imorawetz:

skin is one of my favourite things to paint. (specific brushes are in my list!)

this totally unintentionally looks like side-boob. gotta love it.

2 years ago 37 notes